English 2

Credits: 1
Estimated Completion Time: 2 segments/32-36 weeks
Earliest Start Date: October 2018

Pre-Requisites:

English I recommended

Description

Join us in English II to see how the human experience – real life, your life – is the foundation of the best stories, plays, poems, films, and articles. In each unit of the course, we explore a specific aspect of the human experience such as Laughter, Obstacles, Betrayal, and Fear. Through the study of literature, nonfiction, and life, we will explore what it means to be human, what it means to be fulfilled, triumphant, empowered, and transformed.

Access the site links below to view the Florida Department of Education description and standards:

Regular course description: http://www.cpalms.org/Public/PreviewCourse/Preview/13251

Honors course description:  http://www.cpalms.org/Public/PreviewCourse/Preview/13193

Major Topics and Concepts

<span “arial”,”sans-serif”;=”” font-size:=”” 10pt;=”” mso-fareast-font-family:=”” “times=”” new=”” roman”;’=”” style=”box-sizing: border-box;”>

Segment 1

Module 1 Live, Love, Laugh

  • Readings

Excerpt of Much Ado About Nothing, Selected poems, “The Pomegranate Seeds,” and “Was It a Dream?”

  • Honors

Selected Sonnets

“How Much Land Does a Man Need?” by Leo Tolstoy

  • Concepts

Figurative language

Poetic forms and devices

Elements of Fiction: plot, character, conflict, theme, setting, point of view

Tone

Mood

Diction

Connotation and denotation

Imagery

Syntax

Greek mythology

Allusion

Symbolism

Comma usage

Greek and Latin roots

  • Skills

Conducting literary analysis

Hunting for humor in real life

Experiencing and analyzing poetry

Analyzing short stories

Correcting common punctuation errors

Writing a narrative

 

 

Module 2 Obstacles

  • Readings

Novel choice of:

Hiroshima

Of Mice and Men

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Enrique’s Journey

Ender’s Game

*Students should make a novel selection with the guidance of a parent or guardian.

  • Honors

Research a problem pertaining to the novel and propose a solution

  • Concepts

Purpose and audience in writing

Historical context

Elements of Fiction: Conflict

Elements of Fiction: Character

Critical thinking and problem-solving

Parallel structure

  • Skills

Reading nonfiction and fiction

Developing a reading plan

Researching an author’s life to understand context

Researching real-world problems that are relevant to literature

Informational/Explanatory Writing

Segment 2

Module 3 Fear

  • Readings

“The Premature Burial,” excerpts of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, “The Boarded Window,” “The Sniper,” or “Beware of the Dog,” Roosevelt’s “Four Freedoms” speech, and an excerpt of President Obama’s Welcoming Remarks to Prime Minister Cameron of the United Kingdom.

  • Honors

Literary theory and the short story

Literary theory and the Gothic novel, Rebecca or Jane Eyre

  • Concepts

Characteristics of nonfiction texts

Reading strategies for nonfiction texts

Theme

Gothic literature

Suspense techniques

Gothic and suspense adapted to film

Genre of film critique

Characterization

Greek and Latin roots

  • Skills

Analyzing traits of Gothic literature in fiction

Writing creatively to create alternate twist endings

Analyzing suspense and film through film critique

Using phrases and fragments for effect

Module 4 Betrayal

  • Reading

Julius Caesar

  • Honors

Read “The Lay of the Were-wolf” and write closing arguments defending a character

  • Concepts

Historical context

Shakespearean language

Thematic analysis

Basic elements of persuasion

Compare and contrast

Homonyms

Apostrophes

  • Skills

Reading a play

Researching the life and times of Caesar and Brutus

Analyzing the role and nature of betrayal in life and in the play

Analyzing ethical dilemmas

Researching and writing to persuade a film director to accurately portray Brutus

Compare and contrast characters’ persuasion

 

English II Reading List

Segment 1

Module 1 Live, Love, Laugh

  • Readings

Excerpt of Much Ado About Nothing, Selected poems, “The Pomegranate Seeds,” and “Was It a Dream?”

  • Honors

Selected Sonnets

“How Much Land Does a Man Need?” by Leo Tolstoy

Module 2 Obstacles

  • Readings

Novel choice of:

Hiroshima

Of Mice and Men

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Enrique’s Journey

Ender’s Game

*Students should make a novel selection with the guidance of a parent or guardian.

  • Honors

Research a problem pertaining to the novel and propose a solution

Segment 2

Module 3 Fear

  • Readings

“The Premature Burial,” excerpts of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, “The Boarded Window,” “The Sniper,” or “Beware of the Dog,” Roosevelt’s “Four Freedoms” speech, and an excerpt of President Obama’s Welcoming Remarks to Prime Minister Cameron of the United Kingdom.

  • Honors

Literary theory and the short story

Literary theory and the Gothic novel, Rebecca or Jane Eyre

Module 4 Betrayal

  • Reading

Julius Caesar

 

  • Honors

Read “The Lay of the Werewolf” and write closing arguments defending a character

Required Materials

 

Course Grading

Besides engaging students in challenging curriculum, the course guides students to reflect on their learning and evaluate their progress through a variety of assessments. Assessments can be in the form of practice lessons, multiple choice questions, writing assignments, projects, research papers, oral assessments, and discussions. This course will use the state-approved grading scale. Each course contains a mandatory final exam or culminating project that will be weighted at 20% of the student’s overall grade.***

***Proctored exams can be requested by FLVS at any time and for any reason in an effort to ensure academic integrity. When taking the exam to assess a student’s integrity, the exam must be passed with at least a 59.5% in order to earn credit for the course.

Communication Policy

To achieve success, students are expected to submit work in each course weekly. Students can learn at their own pace; however, “any pace” still means that students must make progress in the course every week. To measure learning, students complete self-checks, practice lessons, multiple choice questions, projects, discussion-based assessments, and discussions. Students are expected to maintain regular contact with teachers; the minimum requirement is monthly. When teachers, students, and parents work together, students are successful.

November 6 @ 23:00
23:00 — 00:00 (1h)

English

Coli McGhee, Jacob Denbrook, Nick Osborn